is titanoboa extinct

Fossils of Titanoboa have been found in the Cerrejón Formation and date back around 58 to 60 million years ago. Scientists place this extinct species in the Boidae family, along with boa constrictors and anacondas. We don’t have enough information to specifically identify the circumstances about Titanoboa ’s extinction, but quite literally every other tetrapod species from 60 million years ago is also now extinct. Until Titanoboa’s discovery, the largest snake fossil ever found came in at 33 feet and weighed 1,000 pounds. The Smithsonian's Titanoboa was unveiled in New York’s Grand Central Station in 2012 and showed the massive snake wolfing down a crocodylian. Its fossils were first discovered in coal mines in La Guajira, Colombia in 2009. For Titanoboa, the lesson is preparation. Research has indicated that the giant snake looked like a boa constrictor—hence its name—but hunted like a crocodile. The Titanoboa was a massive snake that lived in Columbia. Climate change contributed to the disappearance and extinction of most of Titanoboa. The only known species is Titanoboa cerrejonensis, the largest snake ever discovered, which supplanted the previous record holder, Gigantophis. The largest snake species today is the giant anaconda , and it can grow to around 15 feet in length — less than one-third of the size of your average Titanoboa. It is the largest species of snake that ever lived. Recently in2009, while working in the mines of the Cerrejón Formation in Colombia’s LaGuajira, the construction workers come across fossilized skeletons belonging tothe early Paleocene Era. This snake is believed to be about 50 feet long and four feet wide. Archaeologists estimate that this creature lived about 60 million years ago. The Smithsonian's Titanoboa was unveiled in New York’s Grand Central Station in 2012 and showed the massive snake wolfing down a crocodylian. The super snake's kryptonite was natural climate change. Well, you have come to the perfect place! This also means that the indigenous people who may have lived in the forest with the snake would likely not have the same history they do now, mainly because they probably wouldn't survive living in the same habitat as the huge snake. Longer than Tyrannosaurus rex, Titanoboa cerrejonensis is the biggest snake known to science, living or extinct. Titanoboa snakes are believed to weigh around 1500 kg. The Titanoboa is an extinct snake species that is believed to have inhabited South America during the Paleocene Epoch. Spoonfeedz is the place to be for everything from sports fails to funny videos and captivating content. The giant snake lived during the Middle to Late Paleocene epoch, a 10-million-year period immediately following the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event. Looking for some entertainment to beat the boredom? Among themwere a few species of large fish and reptiles including some giant turtles, giganticcrocodiles, etc. They could grow up to 12.8 m (42 ft) long and reach a weight of 1,135 kg (2,500 lb). Titanoboa is an extinct genus of very large snakes that lived in what is now La Guajira in northeastern Colombia – they could grow up to 12.8 m (42 ft) long and reach a weight of 1,135 kg (2,500 lb). Archaeologists estimate that this creature lived about 60 million years ago. Titanoboa, ( Titanoboa cerrejonensis ), extinct snake that lived during the Paleocene Epoch (66 million to 56 million years ago), considered to be the largest known member of the suborder Serpentes. Titanoboa is an extinct genus of very large snakes that lived in what is now La Guajira in northeastern Colombia. Titanoboa is an extinct snake which lived approximately 60 million years ago during the Paleogene Period. Spoonfeedz is all you need to get your daily dose of celebrity gossip, cute animals and our sexy videos may even get your heart racing. Warm-blooded animals that could handle the cooler, drier conditions were now kings and queens of the jungle. Actually, Titanoboa was also considered extinct along with the dinosaurs, but scientists believe that these giant creatures still live in the world’s largest river ‘Amazon River’. A fragment of the vertebrae that was thought to have belongedto a crocodile species was sent forfurther studies. Here are the top nine pieces of trivia about this 50-foot-long, 2,000-pound menace of the Paleocene epoch. Longer than Tyrannosaurus rex, Titanoboa cerrejonensis is the biggest snake known to science, living or extinct. In general, tetrapod species don’t tend to last much longer than about 2 million years. It is the largest species of snake that ever lived. The Titanoboa was a massive snake that lived in Columbia. It would only be able to survive in rainforests with warmer climates near the equator, which is bad news for any central and South Americans that lived anywhere nearby. Fossils of Titanoboa have been found in the Cerrejón Formation and date back around 58 to 60 million years ago. Read on to learn about the Titanoboa. Titanoboa was a true monster among prehistoric snakes, the size and weight of an extremely elongated school bus. © 2020 SpoonFeedz, Inc. All Rights Reserved, Mahana | New Zealand's Lost Hippy Community, Futuristic Short Film | Perfectly Natural, What Every James Bond Girl Looks Like Today, Dog Grooming Video You Never Knew You Needed, Healthy & Delicious Must-Have Breakfast Smoothie, Kim Kardashian Getting Ready For The Met Gala 2019, Turning 2 Hex Nuts into a 1Ct Diamond Ring, Keeping Up With The Kardashians – Season 16 Teaser, Top 5 Foods To Help You Survive Cold And Flu Season, First Look at 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' Film, How St Patricks Day Was Celebrated Around The World, Items People Have Snuck Past Airport Security With. you as our user and our products. Don't worry, all you snake un-enthusiasts -- the Titanboa can only stalk you in your nightmares because it's extinct. Now that you know a bit about the snake, let's get to what life would be like now if the snake still existed. SpoonFeedz Is a SSL encrypted site to protect Titanoboa is an extinct genus of very large snakes that lived in what is now La Guajira in northeastern Colombia – they could grow up to 12.8 m (42 ft) long and reach a weight of 1,135 kg (2,500 lb). Later that year, it was given its name a name which means titanic boa. Our content will have you rolling on the floor and sometimes even asking “WTF did I Just watch?” Stick with us for your daily spoonful of viral sugar. The declining global temperatures favored the emergence of smaller snakes. Let's give you some details to scream about in your dreams. Upon close observa… That was Gigantophis, a snake that lived 20 million years ago in Africa. Paleontologists discovered numerous fossilized remains of the prehistoric snake in 2009 in coal mines in Colombia. In this case, it was probably shifting tectonics that disrupted ocean currents and lowered temperatures. The world's largest snake was a bus-sized boa that inhabited South America 60 million years ago, dubbed the Titanoboa. Scientists place this extinct species in the Boidae family, along with boa constrictors and anacondas. Although no one knows the exact reason why Titanoboa went extinct, two theories have been put forward. Titanoboa is known from several fossils that have been dated to 58 million to 60 million years ago. Larger reptiles were slowly erased and Because it lived 60 million years ago.

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